Andy Davis

Weaving  Structure,    Finding    Form    –    Lighthouses      

    

Andy  Davis      

Mường  Studio    

Residency Time: 17 – 27 December, 2014

 

Construct  a    sculptural    work    responding    to    the    forms    and    patterns    of    the    mountains    of    Hòa Bình province  and    the    Mường    People.    My    current    work    investigates    the    formal    interactions    of    patterns    on    sculptural    surfaces    and    their    narrative    /    historical    origins    (see    Image    08).    During    my    residency  at    Mường    studio,    my    partner    and    I  will    document    with    drawings,    sound,    and    image    the    rich    Mường weaving  tradition,    while    researching    the    narratives    and    symbols    imbedded    in    Mường textiles.  The    repetition    inherent    to    the    weaving    process    will    further    find    an    equivalent    with    the    repetitive    stacking    inherent    in    my    sculptural    process.    The    documentation    portion    of    the    residency    will    be    carried    out    in    collaboration    with    Hanoi based    writer    /    photographer    Hoang    Minh    Thuy    (Collaborator).      During    the    time    of    the    residency,    we    will    also    be    scouting    sites    for    another    iteration    of    the    ongoing    series    Lighthouses.    Previous    sites    include    rural    Missouri,    USA    and    Dong    Nai    province,    Vietnam    (see    Images    04    –    08).

 

Timeline:

I  propose    an    intensive    10 day    residency    for    conducting    research    and    sculptural    work.        December    17,    2014    – December    27,    2014.

 

Materials:

Wooden  units    fabricated    prior    to    the    residency,    and    Lights    for    permanent    installation.    Light    woodworking    equipment    may    be    necessary:    Sanding    implements,    sawing    implements    –    These    can    be    provided    by    the    artist,    depending    on    availability.

 

Process:

Through  field    research    conducted    in    the    form    of    sound,    drawings    and    photography,    we    will    find    an    appropriate    motif    to    conceptually    ‘weave’    the    existing    sculptural    system    with    the    local    colors    and    history    found    in    the    Mường    textile    tradition.    The    structure    will    echo    forms    found    in    the    mountains.    The    surface    will    quote    patterns    found    in    the    life    of    the    mountain’s    inhabitants    /    stewards.    Technically    speaking,    the    blocks    will    be    individually    stacked    and    glued,    then    fixed    in    place    with    a    polymer    suitable    for    outdoor    conditions.    The    form    will    be    sanded    and    painted.    Finally,    lights    will    be    installed    inside    of    the    work    to    illuminate    the    sculpture    during    dark    hours    –    effectively    making    two    sculptures:    a    painted    structure    by    day    and    light    installation    by    night    (see    Images    01,    03).

 

Labor  Support:

The  process    of    stacking    blocks    is    a    meditation    requiring    little    assistance,    thus    the    labor    support    necessary    will    be    in    assisting    the    research    process.    We    will    need    support    and    direction    to    find    local    weavers.    Part    of    the    project    is    to    find    home-­‐looms    and    document    the    weavers    in    the    domestic    setting,    to    either    support    or   debunk    the    theory    that    the    local    weaving    tradition    is    giving    way    to    the    use    of    Chinese    imports.

 

Conclusion:  

The  residency    at    Mường    Studio    is    an    opportunity    for    dialogue    with    the    history    and    culture    of    the    Mường    people,    and    Vietnam    in    general    –a  country    that    continues    to    enrich    my    art    practice    since    my    first    visit    in    2013.    I    aim    to    foster    the    conditions    of    discovery    that    grow    out    of    insecure    situations,    crossing    the    immense    gap    between    cultures    and    artistic    contexts    yielding    new    forms    and    new    ways    of    seeing.    Furthermore,    I    hope    to    support    the    Mường    Studio’s mission    as    an    independent    space    for    contemporary    art    in    Vietnam.

 

2014, Andy Davis, artist in residence, installation, muong air, sculpture, site-specific art, United States, visual art,